Registration and Szentendre

September 6, 2014 § 7 Comments

(Get comfy, you’re in for a long one!)

Yesterday I lived three days in one. Or at least it felt like it. I began the day selling my books at the school book fair. It was so much more hectic than I’d imagined it’d be. The book sale before our first year was on the ground floor and only a handful of students had tables, everyone else had to have their books on a blanket on the floor.

Up to 2 a.m. pricing my books for the book sale after registration. Couldn't randomly price them without KNOWING so I looked up the ISBN numbers, rated the quality and placed them at a price that I would feel comfortable buying them for.

My 2 a.m. book pricing mess. Couldn’t randomly price them without KNOWING so I looked up the ISBN numbers, rated the quality and placed them at a price that I would feel comfortable buying them for.

PriceTags

The suitcase I used to pack my books weighed in at what felt like 200 kilos. This made it so that it took me a full 10 minutes to just make it out of my apartment building. One cab ride, complete with an angry cab driver, and a half-dislocated shoulder later, I was at the Basic Medical Science building. This year’s book sale was upstairs. I’d been warned by a friend I’d met on the first floor that it would be hectic and yet that did not prepare me for the scene I was met with when the elevator doors opened. The entire floor was packed with tables and first year students already buying books. I pushed my way through the crowd, likely making a few people angry, as I searched furiously for my sale station.

Jannie had gotten there before me and luckily spotted me in the chaos. After setting up, time flew by. I met so many students who know me through this little blog right here and it was such a surprise (and so nice to meet you all)! After talking the ears off of pretty much every person who approached our table, I had to run downstairs to partake in an introductory “lecture” for the first year students. The acting director of the English Anatomy department holds a speech at the beginning of the year to introduce the students to anatomy, the biggest class of the first year. She’d asked the future TA’s of anatomy to join and since I was selling my books, I said I would be there. We didn’t do much other than stand there on the side, but maybe it was nice for the first years to see people who have made it through.

After an hour or so more of book selling (and talking) I rushed home to drop off my suitcase and change for a day trip to Szentendre. Szentendre is a beautiful little town with cobblestone streets a 40-minute train ride from the city. We’ve been told about it so many times before, but never gotten around to actually going. Our friend Amir, whom Jannie, her sisters and I had dinner with earlier this week, is an amazing planner and life enthusiast. He was telling us about all of his trips around Hungary and even of some of the adventures he’s had here in Budapest. One of those trips sounded too good to pass up, and that was wine-tasting in Szentendre.

On our way into the town, Amir told us of five things we were going to do. I’m a horrible travel planner myself, so I love being in the company of someone who knows exactly what to do and just decides that we are going to do it.

  1. Dinner and wine-tasting – of course!
  2. Walk down by the river
  3. Christmas store
  4. Marzipan Museum
  5. Chocolatier

SzentendreCanalJandASzentendreCanalSzentendreTownSzentendreTown2FoTerCentrum

Amir told us that there was a "street" that would take us to a viewpoint over the city. The street ended up being this tiny alley - one that I would have never thought to enter. On the way, we passed a hidden outdoor langos restaurant. It was the size of a small bedroom, yet packed with people enjoying the savory (and heavy) Hungarian dish.

Amir told us that there was a “street” that would take us to a viewpoint over the city. The street ended up being this tiny alley – one that I would have never thought to enter. On the way, we passed a hidden outdoor langos restaurant. It was the size of a small bedroom, yet packed with people enjoying the savory (and heavy) Hungarian dish.

Can you spot the restaurant?

Can you spot the restaurant?

Cobbelstones

Just a glimpse of the fantastic Christmas store. I felt completely transported. There were beautiful ornaments of every shape, color, size or style imaginable. We will definitely have to make a trip back during Christmas.

Just a glimpse of the fantastic Christmas store. I felt completely transported. There were beautiful ornaments of every shape, color, size or style imaginable. We will definitely have to make a trip back during Christmas.

ChristmasStore2

Amir’s favorite was the dark, matte royal blue and Jannie’s the white, silver or gold. It was fun to talk about how our families celebrate Christmas. Amir is Pakistani/Israeli, but his family celebrates Christmas because they find it to be such a lovely holiday 🙂

JanniesMan

Jannie and I need to learn how to pose. This was the best shot of 5 pictures...

Jannie and I need to learn how to pose. This was the best shot of 5 pictures… I have no idea what I was going for

A peak at the restaurant we would be having dinner at, before heading down to the river

A peak at the restaurant we would be having dinner at, before heading down to the river

Danube Danube2SzentendreStreetUmbrellas GreenDoor

I couldn't help by eavesdrop on their conversation. A Hungarian man approached the steel drum player and upon learning that the musician wasn't Hungarian, began to speak perfect English. He told the musician of his love for steel drums and said that he wanted to learn to make one of his own. The musician began to tell him of how to do this as I was called away to the marzipan museum.

I couldn’t help by eavesdrop on their conversation. A Hungarian man approached the steel drum player and upon learning that the musician wasn’t Hungarian, began to speak perfect English. He told the musician of his love for steel drums and said that he wanted to learn to make one of his own. The musician began to tell him of how to do this as I was called away to the marzipan museum.

MarcipanMuseum BeautifulVines

MarcipanWoman

The above cake was so massive and the ingredients so shocking that I couldn't help but calculate its nutritional value.

The above cake was so massive and the ingredients so shocking that I couldn’t help but calculate its nutritional value. That’s enough to sustain a 2,000-calorie diet for 216 days – or a 1,200-calorie diet for almost a year!

MarcipanMJMarcipanParliament

Selfie attempt fail. Guess I need some more practice

Selfie attempt fail. Guess I need some more practice

Chocolate bounty from the Chocolatier. My favorite was a dark chocolate cup with a peanut butter cream filling.

Chocolate bounty from the Chocolatier. My favorite was a dark chocolate cup with a peanut butter cream filling.

Small and charming table for dinner. Jannie and I had no idea what awaited us for the wine-tasting that followed.

Small and charming table for dinner. Jannie and I had no idea what awaited us for the wine-tasting that followed.

It was really difficult to take pictures that capture the pure beauty of this wine cellar.  It is 220 years old and 600 sq. meters. It stays at a constant 15 degrees, winter and summer. Makes for slightly chilled red wine, but it was delicious nonetheless.

It was really difficult to take pictures that capture the pure beauty of this wine cellar.
It is 220 years old and 600 sq. meters. It stays at a constant 15 degrees, winter and summer. Makes for slightly chilled red wine, but it was delicious nonetheless.

WineCellar2

The first half of our wine flight. We started with light, freshly bottled white wine, dipped into heavy, dark reds and then he pulled us out with some sweet dessert wines before finishing with a strong black liquor made from poppy seeds - a Hungarian favorite.

The first half of our wine flight. We started with light, freshly bottled white wine, dipped into heavy, dark reds and then he pulled us out with some sweet dessert wines before finishing with a strong black liquor made from poppy seeds – a Hungarian favorite.

Second half of our wine flight. Was such an amazing experience to try these fantastic Hungarian wines in such an old, charming cellar.

Second half of our wine flight. Was such an amazing experience to try these fantastic Hungarian wines in such an old, charming cellar.

Before Amir suggested flash (I'm not much of a photographer, I just like taking pictures ;) )

Before Amir suggested flash (I’m not much of a photographer, I just like taking pictures 😉 )

WineTasting

After the train ride home, we headed for the famous ruin bar, Szimpla kert. I’ve lived here for two years and have never been there, which is shocking to most. Amir felt it was absolutely necessary that I make the leap. If you are planning a trip to Budapest or live here and haven’t been there yet, you must visit – it is amazing!

http://ruinpubs.com/index.php?id=romkocsmak_adatlap&kocsma=7

ruinpubs.com/index.php?id=romkocsmak_adatlap&kocsma=7

mtro.hu/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/szimpla-3.jpg

mtro.hu/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/szimpla-3.jpg

As for registration, well, that was one of the most stressful 10 minutes of my life. Our adrenaline rush didn’t subside for nearly two hours after.

We ended up with almost everything we wanted. I have about half my classes with Jannie and half with Skjalg – which is actually perfect!

Planning our classes went through several phases…and I think I spent way, way too much time on it all. It did work out in the end though, so who’s to say it wasn’t worth it.

Phase 1

Random crazy person sheets with scribbles and time slots…

FirstDrafts

Phase 2

Modern day technology user. I used the notes from phase 1 to make up these possible schedules here. These I sent to Skjalg and Jannie, so we could start narrowing the classes down.

Phase 3

Mapping! Jannie and I sat for several hours before registration and made up these little registration maps. We wanted to make sure we had back-up plans for everything. In the end, I think we must’ve had something like 50 potential schedules. Jannie ended up getting most of the green path (our first choice) whereas I ended up with the blue path.

PlanABPlanCD

Final product

Well, not really final. I have some scheduling conflicts to work out – i.e. find a Hungarian class I can sneak into! I will be meeting with the physiology tutor on Tuesday (I’ve been accepted as a TA in physiology as well, so will be TAing for both anatomy and physiology ). I hope everything works out smoothly….it’s a little bit of a mess to look at right now.

3rdYearSchedule

 

Otherwise, I’ve spent the entire day inside. I set up a grocery delivery from Tesco for 14:00-16:00, but by 17:00, I hadn’t heard anything. After waiting in the call que for 20 minutes, I found out they were experiencing major technical difficulties and that the delivery wouldn’t be made until between 18:00-22:00. Safe to say I’m not in the best mood. Ordering groceries online is amazing – when it works as planned! I’d planned to be boring and stay in anyway, but I don’t want to be forced to do so.

Tie it to a Goal

September 3, 2014 § 5 Comments

During an unintentional philosophical discussion with my brother today (on Skype), he shared with me the following quote:

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The topic of discussion was one of our favorites: the pursuit of greatness. We were raised to be the best possible versions of ourselves at all times. We were raised to seek out challenges and the dark corners of the unknown. We were taught to accept a constant state of change as a means of fulfilling all that of which we are capable. I remember one instance very well, which I’m sure my mom will love to see that I’ve shared here. I was about 8 or 9 years old and we had been given our very first report cards at school. I remember very clearly that we had no idea what any of it meant. We stared blankly at our own cards for a while and finally began comparing ours to each others in efforts of understanding what the letters meant. I soon learned that mine were what was considered “good” and couldn’t wait to go home and show them off. When I finally brought it to my mom, she saw my “B” and said, “That’s good, Bianca, but what did you do wrong?”.

I’m sure that garners an array of reactions, but for me, that is one of my favorite memories. Sure, it didn’t feel so great then. I didn’t really understand what she meant, much less what the grade itself meant. What I did learn was that I could do better and most importantly that I should strive to do better. I learned that I was capable of the best if I worked hard enough and smart enough. And it was later that I would learn that the act of even striving for the best made me stronger, regardless the outcome.

On Monday morning, we begin medicine. Yes, we are two years in. We started at the basic of the basic. We fought through classes we didn’t see the point of and survived exams that felt completely unrelated to our chosen career path. In those two years, we learned the entire healthy human body, in and out, and now, we will learn everything that can go wrong with it. As one of my TAs (teaching assistants) told me a couple of weeks ago, “Now, you start medical school.”.

It still feels a little scary. Sometimes I catch myself thinking things like “this is where they are going to find out I’m a fraud” or “This is where I’ll realize I’ll never be a doctor”. Scary, mean thoughts, I know, but they are there nonetheless. I used to be more affected by thoughts like that, more so by ones I had of myself than those others had of me. Over time I’ve come to realize that I find them motivational, in a twisted kind of way. Those thoughts arise when I need a little kick. Nothing motivates me more than telling me I can’t do something. (Example: Jannie moved this past weekend and Skjalg told me I couldn‘t carry the four large, packed IKEA bags I was eyeballing (he actually said “don’t” because he knows how I react to “you can’t”, but I heard it as the latter). What did I do? I loaded up! And I’ve got a strand of broken blood vessels on my shoulder to prove it.)

I’ve spent the majority of the past 24 hours putting together my schedule for this next semester. Spending so much time organizing classes I know so little about unleashed a flood gate of negative motivating thoughts. There is a lot more pressure on us this year because we no longer have our schedules planned for us. There are schedule suggestions, but we no longer have to adhere to our oh-so-comforting group number. Bye, bye, Group 12! Hello, Change!

Throughout this planning marathon, I’ve been thinking about Baba Shiv’s TEDtalk “Sometimes it’s good to give up the driver’s seat”:

Oh, how I wish I could give up the driver’s seat for this semester schedule! But no, it’s time to step up and embrace the change once more.

At 18:00 tomorrow, 180 or so of us will furiously activate our semesters in the online registration system and go head-to-head in a battle for the classes of our choosing. Each of the subjects is divided into about 15 groups and each group has only 9-12 spots. We’ve gotten recommendations from students who have completed 3rd year about which professors to take and have built up potential schedules from those recommendations. Jannie, Skjalg and I are planning on taking as many classes together as possible, but have been warned that no one ever gets the schedule they want. I think it’s safe to say I’m a little stressed…

Otherwise, a lot has happened these past two weeks, including the end of nursing practice, the passing of my 27th birthday (which I spent alone *party*), Skjalg’s two-day stop off in Budapest before flying off to Thailand with his dad, and Jannie’s return to Budapest, complete with a move to a new apartment and visit from her two sisters.

Now I am off to bed, registration day awaits!

Nurses tried to find something for us to do, so they printed out their information sheet. At least I know the average weights of babies/children now!

Nurses tried to find something for us to do, so they printed out their information sheet. At least I know the blood pressure ranges of babies/children now! (Look how easy the Hungarian is, Mom! 😛 )

Cheers to this random guy, who kept photobombing this newscaster no matter how hard the cameraman tried to avoid him. Made me laugh hysterically – and out loud! – at the gym. I blame the endorphins. He even got his own sign-off!

Procession of St. Stephen's Hand on August 20th

Procession of St. Stephen’s Hand on August 20th

View of the fireworks on August 20th from the comfort of our dining area

View of the fireworks on August 20th from the comfort of our dining area

Happy birthday to me! Looks so gross, I know. Made myself a protein cake with protein ice cream, which I enjoyed while Skyping with my brother - who made sure to laugh at the site of it!

Happy birthday to me! Looks so gross, I know. Made myself a protein cake with protein ice cream, which I enjoyed while Skyping with my brother – who made sure to laugh at the site of it!

:)

🙂

Lots of books to sell at the book fair this Friday (5th)!!!

Lots of books to sell at the book fair this Friday (5th)!!!

A happy, happy day when Buda-B got accepted as an anatomy TA. Watch out, Group 14, here I come!

A happy, happy day when Buda-B got accepted as an anatomy TA. Watch out, Group 14, here I come! (I’ll be a teaching assistant to my former anatomy professor 😀 )

2014-08-29 21.14.24

Sklajg’s first day back in Budapest, before heading off to Thailand. It was my replacement birthday and we spent the day in the park sipping sipping champagne – perfection!

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Bubbles and snacks! Tuna salad, holiday dip with greek yogurt and veggies

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My first attempt at proteinpow.com's spinach pancakes - topped with greek yogurt and Walden Farms pancake syrup.

My first attempt at proteinpow.com’s spinach pancakes – topped with greek yogurt and Walden Farms pancake syrup.

Drive-by opera sighting

Drive-by opera sighting

Don't forget to look up when in Budapest. You never know just how beautiful the buildings are going to be.

Don’t forget to look up when in Budapest. You never know just how beautiful the buildings are going to be.

Two years ago…

August 20, 2014 § 1 Comment

…we celebrated our first national holiday in Budapest! It was our third day living here and everything we did felt like an adventure. We made sure to see all of the events that happened that day: the air and water show, the food festival, Hungarian dancing and fireworks. It was an amazing induction into Hungarian culture and the beauty of Budapest. I documented nearly every second of that day in my blog post: Saint Stephen’s Day – Celebrating the Foundation of the Hungarian State. Worth a visit to relive those moments. Last year we were in Budapest, but instead of joining the crowds, we got take-out from a nearby restaurant and watched the fireworks from our kitchen island with some glasses of champagne.

Had we moved here this year, we would not have had anywhere near the same experience. The weather is poor, gloomy and wet. Miklós told me that they won’t do the fireworks if the weather is bad. Several years ago, there was a thunderstorm and people still flooded the bridges and streets encircling the Danube to watch the fireworks show. He said that a tree branch fell somewhere and ended up killing two people, and since then, they have decided to only carry out the show if the weather is good.

It’s my day off from work and I feel like my skull is shrinking. My sleeping pattern is so poor with this work schedule and I’m definitely feeling the consequences. My plan for today was to start off by going to the gym and then study the rest of the day, since the quiz for our Exercise Physiology class is due early Thursday morning. I haven’t been enjoying the class as much as I thought I would. The lectures aren’t very stimulating and my interest in the topic can only fuel my motivation so much. After talking a little bit to Skjalg, I decided to drop the class and instead give myself a break from studying until school starts up again in a couple of weeks. If I feel the urge to study, I can always watch a Dr. Najeeb video. Otherwise, I’d rather fill my time with some leisure reading. My brother Christian recommend a book called Not Entirely a Benign Procedure and I am really interested in it. He said it is a book of diary entries of a medical student during her four years of medical school in the US and that the author is very talented and witty. Skjalg told me that I have to finish one of the other 15 books I’m “reading” before I start a new one, but I’m going to sneak this one in anyway…

Work on Monday was terrible. We were there for 9 hours and all we did was make four beds and register three patients, so a total of 40 minutes of work. When we were in Neurology, they were good about letting us go if there wasn’t anything to do (though, it felt like there was more to do when we were there). The head nurse of the Gastroenterology department is oddly strict. We had a rush of patients between 9 and 11, and after that, there was nothing to do. There were four patients in the department, three nurses, three nurse interns and the three of us, and still, she said we weren’t allowed to leave until four. So, for the last three hours, we stood there, watching the nurses sit on their phones or quiz each other on dosages of medications. For one hour, I counted the paper butterflies on the walls according to their color scheme. We couldn’t help but get angry about it. It’s not that we were lazy and wanted to go home, just that we wanted to do something. Cleaning, organizing, any mundane task possible! As the hours ticked on without a task, I got frustrated at the thought of seconds of my life slipping away for no reason. I’m generally good at finding a reason to make any situation “worth it” but this was ridiculous.

We’d decided that, on Tuesday morning, we would talk to the head nurse of the hospital, the one organizing our practice. Another day like Monday would have driven us insane. (We wanted to do anything – anything! – other than just stand there. We’d change every bed in the hospital if we could.) I was alone when she emerged from her office that morning and approached me to say hello. When she asked how things were going I explained, in my best easy-to-understand English, “Yesterday, it was very slow. We only changed 4 beds and registered 3 patients. It was not very nice to only stand there.” She nodded in understanding, smiled and told me that we should probably take a half-day. She seems to care a lot about our experience here and has been really good about planning things for us to see and do, at least during the first two weeks.

After she left, the boys showed up and we headed towards the department. The head nurse of Gastroenterology, endearingly referred to as Big Red by us, raced up behind us, pressing on our heels and goading us to walk faster in Hungarian. At the entrance of the department, the head nurse of the hospital was waiting. The conversation that ensued was one that I really, really wish I had been able to understand. I picked up some words, but Miklós had to fill in the rest once we were alone and settled. Big Red had been told by the head nurse of the hospital that there was no point to keep us standing around, doing nothing, for hours on end and that we should be sent home if there is absolutely nothing for us to do. She was then criticized for something that didn’t have anything to do with us: there was only one patient staying in the department, only two schedule to come in for the entire day and she had three nurses working. Miklós said that she was told that the nurses shouldn’t be “in Hawaii” – a term for lounging around in Hungarian – and that she had to send someone home (which she never did).

After their little talk, Big Red ignored us for the rest of the day. She complained to the other nurses for a while and then disappeared to the back. We, of course, care about making a good impression and are doing our best to be respectful, but it had just reached a point where we needed to stand up for ourselves. Jun and I, as English students, are paying $350 for this practice. If there is nothing for us to do in one department, we will gladly go to another or honestly anywhere where we can do/learn something. But if they are just going to have us stand around and doing nothing for hours, well, then they are also making us pay with our time in addition to our money. Big Red is honestly the only person who has made that an issue and for what reason, we’ll probably never know.

The shift on Tuesday ended up being a little better. Some doctors stopped by for lactose intolerance testing and we were allowed by one of the nurses to complete the test. For the test, they are asked to swallow a solution containing lactose and then the hydrogen content of their breath is measured every 30 minutes for 3 hours. People who are intolerant of lactose (like me!) lack the enzyme that breaks down the sugar in the intestine. As a result, the lactose continues until it reaches the gut flora (bacteria) which do have the enzyme. When they break it down, they produce hydrogen and sometimes methane, which appear in the subjects breath. For people who are not lactose intolerant, we would expect their breath values to be 0, whereas those who are, can have really any value other than 0. So, every thirty minutes, we had them breathe into a plastic bag attached to a large syringe. When the bag was inflated, we opened the syringe, filled it with the air from the bag, and then closed it again. We then attached the syringe to a H2 reader, injected the air into it and waited for the result. The results were interesting: one patient had 0, 5, 0, 9, 0, 5, 0, whereas the other had 0, 0, 0, 0, 11, 38, 54.

A more advanced version of the one we used. Credit: USF Health's website.

A more advanced version of the one we used. Credit: USF Health’s website.

At 11:00, the department entry was empty again and there were only two patients checked-in. The three of us and the three nurse interns sat in the waiting area, watching the nurses sit in the nursing station on their phones and chatting. Big Red had been marching back and forth in the hall on the phone, loudly remarking various things to the nurses. Miklós told me earlier that she some of the things she says are pretty rude. One of her phone calls was more intense and I asked Miklós to translate it. He said that she had been informed that they would be closing the department since there were only two patients and that the patients would be moved up to hematology until Thursday. She didn’t want to close the department, so she was calling around trying to find another patient to put in the department so that they wouldn’t have to close. With so little to do that they are being told to close the department and you’d think she’d let us go, right? Nope. She told us we couldn’t leave until 1:00 – exactly a half-shift. I’m sure there are more logical reasons for keeping the department open – i.e. making sure the nurses get paid – but when it came to keeping us, especially after her conversation with the head nurse, I just didn’t understand. At 12:45, she told us to go and change and then didn’t return our goodbyes when we left. I have such fond memories of the first two weeks that it is unfortunate that it may end on a more sour note. There are still three days, but two of those leave Jun and I without a translator! Tomorrow we’re planning on asking the head nurse of the hospital if there is another department we can visit. We’ll see how that goes…

On a lighter note, I tried overnight chia oats for the first time! Oats, chia seeds, banana protein powder, coconut flakes, light coconut milk and some splenda overnight in the fridge and then topped with some berries in the morning. Will be a quick and refreshing treat to have in the mornings once school starts.

ChiaOats2 ChiaOats1

 

8 down, 5 to go!

August 17, 2014 § 4 Comments

Only 5 more shifts left of nursing practice and I can’t wait for it to be over. I have learned a lot, but in the end, there is so little that we are qualified to do – especially with such limited Hungarian. Most of the time, I feel like we are just in the way.

Our night shift went well – at least for the first 6 hours. Instead of doing it in Neurology, we were transferred to Gastroenterology. We’d never met any of the nurses there, but once they got over the surprise that there were three of us, they were pretty nice. We started by changing some beds, checking the soap and tissue dispensers in the department and checking that the emergency bag was up-to-date. Poor Miklós, we are pretty much completely handicapped without him. Checking the medications was fine, but when it came to checking different tools and gadgets that weren’t labeled with a name, we were helpless. I know this all doesn’t sound very exciting, but that’s part of my plan. I wanted to bore you before telling you what made the whole night worth it: we got to practice drawing each other’s blood! I know nurses do it all the time, but it was still so exciting for me. We learned which areas to check for veins, how to identify a good vein, veins to avoid and the techniques for inserting/withdrawing the needle.

Around midnight, we got a call saying that a new patient would be arriving: a four-year-old boy with stomach pain and vomiting. We were allowed to check him in, something that made us feel accomplished. Miklós had to take the history, so Jun and I took his head and chest measurements, weight, height and blood pressure. Once he was shown to his room, I was tasked with taking his temperature. He’d been a little grumpy when he first arrived and had escalated to near impossible by the time we got to his room. Every time I tried to bring the thermometer to his ear, he became hysterical, tossing his head back and forth so that I couldn’t get near him. When I did manage to get close, he screamed and hit my hand. His mom was trying to calm him down the best she could, but there wasn’t much that could be done. With the language/culture barrier, I didn’t feel comfortable forcefully grabbing his head and holding it still while I took the measurement. Had it been a situation where I could have spoken English, I would have handled the situation differently. I would have explained what I was going to do, maybe let him try doing it on me, and if none of that had worked, calmly explained to the mom that I was going to need to hold his head down. Eventually the nurse came in and told us that we should just try to do it later – thankfully!

After the thermometer incident, the night quickly transitioned to a game of “who can keep their eyelids open the longest”. At 1, one of the nurses asked us if we were curious about the patients in the department. The one I remember most was a boy, not even 10 years old, suffering from a brain tumor. She told us that his brother had died of the same condition last year and that he didn’t have more than a couple of months to live himself. It made me so sad to think that such a young boy was given such little time on this earth. In addition to the tumor, he’d had a right atrial infarction (heart attack in his right atria) and stomach pain. Later on, the other nurse walked us through how to hook up the oxygen in case his condition worsened over the night. When I asked why he was in Gastroenterology and not Oncology, the nurse answered that even she didn’t really understand the reason, but that it had something to do with statistics/bureaucratic nonsense concerning his nationality (non-Hungarian).

On Friday, we expected to do our practice in Gastroenterology. We had been told that we would be doing the remaining shifts there instead of Neurology (apparently so that Jun and I could experience more of the hospital). When I showed up Friday morning, I tried my best to communicate why I was there, but communication proved impossible. I ended up sitting and waiting for Jun and Miklós, since I didn’t want to just help myself to the changing room and start fiddling around with the soap boxes. Before the boys showed up, the head nurse arrived. After cordial greetings, I explained that I wasn’t able to tell the nurses that I would be working there that day. I was careful to use English appropriate for the situation and yet she still needed 3 minutes alone to understand what I’d said. She then told me that we would instead be going to Pulmonology for the day, since there were residents there that spoke English (whom we never ended up meeting).

Our stint in Pulmonology was the slowest yet. We were introduced to all the cases and then took the temperatures of a few of the patients. After that? Nothing! I didn’t want to totally waste my time, so I decided to harass Miklós with questions about Hungarian. He will be finishing his practice on Thursday, which leaves Jun and I to fend for ourselves for two days. Two days without a translator! In anticipation of this, I tried to think of some questions/statements that we could have translated beforehand. I carry around a little book for notes, some Hungarian terms/words and some diagnoses that we are told about so that I can look them up at home.

These are examples of words I noted down before I started the practice:

NursingVocab2 NursingVocab

Here are some of the questions that Miklós translated:

NursingSentences

After the question-translating and a little lesson on how to conjugate verbs in different tenses, we moved on to Hungarian vowels. Miklós had been stressing the importance of them and how they were each their own letter and not variations on the original vowels. I told him about similar vowels in Norwegian – æ ø å – but that didn’t seem to matter…

I was having a hard time with them – there are 14! – so I made up a little game: Miklós would say a word in Hungarian that started with a vowel and I had to guess which vowel it was. From the results, you can see where my weaknesses lie.

HungarianVowelGame

So that was Friday! Exciting stuff…

Now, it’s late Sunday night and I’m trying to trick my body into falling asleep before midnight so that I don’t only get 5 hours of sleep. By tricking it, I mean getting into bed before 21:00. I’m looking forward to this being done so that my sleep cycle becomes more regular…right now it’s a bit manic. Can you spot the nights before work and the nights before a day off? I feel like a sloth-robot hybrid!

SleepBot

Off to the Night Shift I go

August 12, 2014 § 6 Comments

Whoa, time is going by fast! It’s been almost a month since my last post and it feels more like a week. In that time, we had one last trip to Halsa with almost Skjalg’s entire family on his dad’s side – everyone except his sister, Kaja, who had to work. Then there were a few days back in Bodø before I hopped my flight(s) home to Budapest for summer practice (which I am doing in the pediatrics hospital). I had a couple days back here before practice started, but I don’t remember what I did. I think there was a lot of sleeping. It was so, so nice to be back home in my own space, in the middle of this beautiful, bustling city.

I was really nervous for the first day of nursing practice. I had no idea what to expect, save for a few tips I got from our friend Mads, who did the practice in July:

You have to work 120 hours, max 12 hours in a day. You can’t work weekends and you have to work one night shift. This means that you can finish it in 10 working days (9 day shifts and 1 night shift). The earliest you start is 6 am and the latest you work until is 6 pm. Our night shift was from 6pm to 6am.

You are not gonna be working with any english students. You get paired together with a hungarian student and the two of you go to a specific ward and you never see the other students again. I worked in the rheumatology/nephrology/immunology ward by the way. You have to work at the same times as your hungarian partner because he/she needs to translate (the nurses don’t know a single word of english and the doctors don’t work with you). So you have to agree with him/her when you can work. It’s normal to just bang it out in 10 working days.

All in all, I thought it was really worthwhile. Ok, there’s no money, but I learned a lot in those 6 days i worked… more than if I had worked in Norway at a sykehjem. It started getting repetitive towards the end and the days get longer though, but that’s just how it is with jobs like these.

The morning of, I was expecting to be met with a crowd of students in front of the head nurse’s office door. Instead, it was empty. I checked the clock a couple 100 times, just to be sure that I hadn’t made some big mistake (i.e. wrong day, wrong time, possible time change). At 7 on the dot, I just decided to go with it and knocked on her door. It ended up that Jun, the younger brother of my friend and groupmate Rina, was the only other English student doing practice there. Jun and Rina were raised partly in the US, in Tennessee, and partly in Japan. Jun also attended college in Minnesota. They both speak perfect American English, so I have to remind myself that they live in Japan and not the states.

The head nurse led us down a long hallway and on the way, explained that we would be working the first week in the gastroenterology department and then after that, the Neurology department. Since the nurses of Gastroenterology were all on vacation, they had temporarily moved Neurology down to the Gastroenterology department and combined the two. Once we entered the department, we were introduced to the head nurse (of neurology) and our Hungarian partner, Miklós (pronounced: meek-lowsh). After the introductions, we were led to a restroom where we could change. Jun and I exchanged glances of panic and then informed them that we hadn’t been told of any uniform and only had what we had on us. In the past, when we have visited hospitals where we need special clothing, we were given scrubs/lab coats. I was wearing a white t-shirt, black pants and shoes and Jun was wearing grey pants and a white shirt. There was half an hour or so of bureaucratic drama (we weren’t allowed to loan scrubs without a signed note from the university) and finally we ended up with some plastic booties and long white lab coats. Once we got off work that day, it was off to the malls to buy some all white shirts, pants and shoes.

A week has gone by since we started our practice and the days have been full with work, working out and studying for my courses on Coursera. On Wednesday, I spent the day studying for, and then taking my quiz, in Exercise Physiology. Then, this past weekend, I had my final in Programmed Cell Death. I was slacking a bit on the lectures, so I didn’t turn in my final until late Sunday night. I ended up with a 95% in the course, with which I am pretty satisfied. It wasn’t always extremely exciting material to cover, but I feel that I have learned a lot that will help me this coming year. If anything, I’m happy that I understand the mechanisms behind some current cancer treatments.

Tonight we will be having our first and only night shift. I tried to sleep in as long as possible, since I will be working from 18:00-6:00. I’ll be bringing some movies and a book, since I know there will be nothing to do. Hopefully it’s not too terrible!

Fourth Semester Snapshots

July 14, 2014 § 3 Comments

While cleaning up some documents on my computer (out with the old, in with the new), I’ve found some pictures that I’ve taken throughout the semester that I don’t believe have made it to my blog. These little moments are no less important to me than those that actually made it into my posts throughout the semester, so I thought I’d put together a picture post. So, here are some random snapshots from 4th semester.

I’ve added in links to posts I wrote on the same dates as some of the photos, in case anyone wants to travel back in time or get some more context.

January/February: Week long visit to my family in California. (Post: On your mark, get set, 4th semester!)

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My beautiful mama 🙂 From my trip back to California in January

Spotted in Oakland, Ca: daytime roof drinking

Spotted in Oakland, Ca: daytime roof drinking

Valentine’s Day 2014 – Skjalg came home from school to homemade cookies and chocolate covered strawberries and hearts all over the walls of the apartment, each with something I love about him written on them.

March 8th: I see this man all the time. He has 5 of the exact same type of dog and always looks miserable when he takes them out for a walk.

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March 9th: welcoming the spring with another walk (Post: Budapest is Beautiful)

Present from Skjalg found on my iPad

Present from Skjalg found on my iPad

March 10th: another beautiful evening in Budapest

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March 12th: whiteboard gets some use while cramming for our endocrinology quiz in physio

March 14th: and again for our anatomy midterm on the head and neck

March 15th: We had our anatomy midterm on Monday (the 15th was a Saturday morning). Jannie, Skjalg and I stayed in and crammed the entire weekend. That Saturday morning, I was up a little early and headed out for an early morning walk. When I reached parliament, I came upon some kind of demonstration/celebration. It turned out that it was an event to commemorate the Hungarian Revolution of 1848, which sparked the war that led to Hungary’s independence from Austria. March 15th is one of Hungary’s three national holidays. I joined the crowd and soaked up the experience for 15 minutes or so, before heading back home to study.

March 15th: More cramming to be had later in the day. We had to order sushi for lunch – of course! (Post: Second to Last Anatomy Midterm: Check!!)

March 18th: some kind of numbering system in our physio lab book. I got the first 8 on my lab exam in May (so, numbers 1, 4, 5, 8, 7, 8, 7 and 8 😉 )

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March 22nd: sick of pictures of Budapest yet? Doesn’t help that I think everything is so beautiful all the time!

March 30th: A lazy Sunday when Jannie and I weren’t getting anything done while trying to study, so we decided the seize the day, push the table away and enjoy some white wine in the sun. (Post: Spring Forward – you’ll notice this post was written before Jannie and I gave up studying for the day.)

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April 1st: Jannie and I spent the whole day at the library and after it closed at 20:00, stopped in for a tapas dinner and champagne sangria at Pata Negra. As an April Fools joke that day, Skjalg had sent me a text saying that they’d sold our apartment and had to move in June.

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April 3rd: Frustration while studying biochem. Unable to find any information in any book about a topic for our midterm – until I found the paper the lecturer wrote about it online. Then noticed a major typo in one of his chemical formulas in one of his lecture slides. Guess people with M.D., PhD., D.Sc. are also prone to stupid mistakes…makes me feel a little better about mine.

April 7th: Histology consultation. We didn’t have any histology classes this semester and since we needed to know 100 slides for the final, we decided to get a head start and attend some of the consultations.

April 9th: One of the absolutely delicious meals that Jannie and I make while studying. Always some kind of protein, black rice and salad – with plenty of sea salt flakes and drizzled olive oil. Yum!

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April 11th: Stopping in at the Easter market in Budapest before jumping on the train for our weekend trip to Vienna. On the train, we split a mini bottle of bubbles – would have been bigger if that little thing hadn’t been so expensive! (Post: Easter “Break” and Weekend in Vienna)

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April 16th: Studying and bipolar Budapest sky

April 17th: Flowers from my man 🙂

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April 20th: Biochem lecture says: drink red wine!

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April 22nd: Prospective dates for the anatomy final are posted – cue panic!

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April 26th: Wouldn’t you like to get woken up by a parade of firetrucks at 8:30 in the morning? Downside of living smack dab in the center of the city.

April 30th: Two shots of the same sky, within 45 minutes of each other. Beautiful and unstable… (Post: Peek-a-boo)

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Same day – 3 very different weather conditions between me, my mom and my brother.

May 3rd: I met Hugo! He’d been reading my blog for a little while and when he came to visit Budapest, asked if we could meet up for coffee. I’m so happy I did because he is an amazing man – smart, motivated and funny! He’s started his own blog, detailing his journey to medical school, check it out! http://onthewaytomedschool.blogspot.no/

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May 4th: Jannie’s birthday! Well, the day before her birthday. It is actually on May 5th, but since that fell on a Monday this year, we celebrated on Sunday. Started the day with a home workout, protein shake, protein cake and then once Skjalg woke up, we made a yummy breakfast. After that? A long day of studying! Can’t be lazy when exam period is only two weeks away.

May 6th: Early morning Hungarian cramming. With the other subjects taking up so much of our time, Hungarian gets little to no love. Our oral exam was that day and the only time we had to study for it was that morning. So, we headed to school a couple hours early and did our best with the time we had. Ended up working out perfectly!

May 10th: Keeping myself entertained while studying. Skjalg and Jannie get a makeover and the little night-time bug that decided to stay on my notes for 20 minutes got himself a house.

May 11th: 10 km race starts in the park outside our apartment. They meant serious business with that mini ambulance…

May 13th: Finally! A defense for my high level of stress 😉

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May 16th: Chaos trying to get our Hungarian signatures. We have these grade books called indexes that we have to get signed at the end of each semester (in order to be allowed to take the final exam). These must also be taken with us to all of our exams and then handed in to the English Secretariat at the end of the exam period.

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May 17th: First day of exam period. This was my home for an entire month. Ready, set, go!

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May 18th: Changed up our studying style by watching Kaplan videos on physiology while munching on popcorn and sipping Hell energy drinks. Physio cramming was in full force! (Post: Two semesters of physio lectures….)

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June 7th: Caught ya! Skjalg took anatomy and physio on different dates than Jannie and I, so while we were freaking out about anatomy, he had already started with biochem (as you can see here). (Post: Anatomy Final Exam)
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June 8th: There is always something going on on the street outside our house. Everything from moped gangs, beer bikes, karaoke taxis and party buses. Gives us something to look at when we are cooped up inside all day during exam period.

June 29th: Only 1 more day in Budapest and the wind didn’t want me to spend it studying Programmed Cell Death.

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That about does it! Always fun to take a trip down memory lane 🙂 Even if it is only the past few months.

The value of achievement lies in the achieving

July 13, 2014 § 2 Comments

It’s been almost a month since we passed our last exam and accomplished one of the toughest milestones of this chapter in our lives. We are now third year students and are ready to move deeper into medicine now that we have two years worth of pre-clinical knowledge behind us.

The time since then has gone by both really slowly and really quickly at the same time. I was almost completely burned out after our anatomy final on the 5th of June and that meant that every single day that followed was a struggle. I lacked almost all motivation and struggled greatly to absorb even the simplest of details. Still, I kept pushing forward, one foot in front of the other. I was nowhere near as effective as I usually am, but I had no choice but to continue. In those 48 hours before our exam, we were all going a little crazy. The apartment was a mess, we were eating almost nothing but take-out and were doing our best to keep the nearby shop out-of-stock of energy drinks. As we got closer to the exam, the only thing I could do to study was re-write the almost 100 chemical reactions we needed to know, over, and over, and over again.

The exam was split into two parts. The first contained about 15 or so open questions worth something like 27 points. In order to pass that portion, we needed a minimum of 14. After that, we had a 10 minute break – enough time to go to the bathroom and gather ourselves. Then it was back in for the second and third sections, which were combined to form a total of 70 multiple-choice questions. I was feeling so hopeless about the exam that I had pretty much already accepted that I was going to fail (a feeling that is all-too familiar to me). Skjalg had advised me to just go with my gut and not second-guess myself. I have a tendency to speed through multiple-choice questions and answer purely on instinct, barely even reading the whole question. Sometimes it works out, sometimes it doesn’t. For the last few written exams, I’ve been forcing myself to stay longer and end up going through my exam even 3 or 4 times before handing it in. This time, I was just going to fly through it and only change an answer if I was 100% sure.

Afterwards, we were all in a bit of shock. The exam had felt impossible and there were all too many questions that I didn’t feel good about. Most of my answers were chosen out of pure instinct. I think there were only 15 or so that I knew I’d gotten correct. All of us were feeling pretty horrible, but we’ve learned to just go with it and wait until the results come out. Skjalg and I headed home, while Jannie and Andrea (a Canadian-Hungarian girl in our class) walked towards Kiraly. The entire way home, I was online on our school website constantly refreshing the exam results page to see if my grade had been uploaded. A little premature, yes, but you never know! We stopped in to grab a bite to eat at a nearby take-out place and while Skjalg was in line, the results were uploaded. I said his name three or four times, barely loud enough for even myself to hear, as I quadruple-checked the results. When he finally came over I said, “I passed! I got a 3!”. He didn’t really react that much and instead scrambled for his phone. Once he’d found out that he had passed, he let out a deep breath and the celebrating began!

There wasn’t too much in the way of celebrating that night. We had a bottle of champagne and some amazing Italian food from my favorite, Trattoria La Coppola. Then Jannie headed out for a night of fun, while Skjalg and I stayed in for a comfy date night on the couch – which was long, long overdo! I have no idea what we did in the days that followed. I was in such a zombie state, stressed with no reason to be and utterly exhausted. On the Friday after the exam, I started another juice fast to clear my body of the horrible things I did to it during exam period (too much caffeine and poor food choices). I did it for 10 days – nothing but 5 juices a day, no food, no coffee, no nothing! Needless to say, there wasn’t too much that happened during that time except for a few get-togethers with friends and lots and lots of sleeping. After the juice fast ended, I had one day and then I was off to Bodø!

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Flashback to our last biochemistry lab! Our teacher surprised us with eppendorf tubes filled with whiskey, blue curacao and vodka.

AnumRina

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Joining Jannie on her apartment hunt. This one was pretty strange – but had a beautiful view!

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View from the plane – still amazed at how bright it is at night! I arrived around 23:30

I arrived in Bodø Tuesday night last week and since then have been filling my days with plenty of sleep and family time. We spent the first weekend at Skjalg’s family’s cabin in Halsa and will be heading back there next weekend. The first trip was with his grandparents and this next trip will be almost the whole gang – his grandparents plus his uncles, aunt and cousins. Skjalg’s sister left just today after a week in town. It’s too bad she won’t be able to be here for the trip to Halsa, but she will be coming to visit us in Budapest in September.

In addition to family time and sleeping, I’ve been going to the gym, helping paint the house and….taking a class!! I’ve had least 3 people tell me I’m crazy and that I should just take a break, but I miss the brain stimulation too much. I’m taking a course called Programmed Cell Death through Coursera. The site offers tons of courses within many different fields – for free! The courses are offered by many different universities all over the world, including Johns Hopkins, Standford and UCSD. The university offering my course is Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich – the same school that Skjalg’s grandfather attended for dentistry. It’s a small world!

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Week 4 of the 6-week course starts tomorrow. There are 2 quizzes (each worth 30% of your grade) and a final exam (worth 40%). Each quiz allows 3 attempts and is worth a total of 25 points. I used all three attempts today trying to get a perfect score, but the best I got was 24.33/25. I guess I’ll just have to settle for 97% ;). The course itself is very interesting and goes quite deep into genetics and biochemistry. I’m hoping that it will come into good use when we start microbiology next semester. On the 24th, both Skjalg and I will be starting another course called Exercise Physiology. I’m really, really excited for that one!

I only have a couple more weeks here in Norway before I head back to Budapest for my nursing practice. I got a spot in the pediatrics department near school and am looking really forward to getting some practical experience. It will be really hard to be away from Skjalg for so long, especially because I’ll be spending my birthday alone down there, but we’ll handle it like champs – we’ve had enough practice with tough situations at this point!

 

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